was successfully added to your cart.

Sustainability expert backs Preston Trampower plan

Sustainability expert backs Preston Trampower plans for trams in Preston - more at www.remsol.co.uk

A leading sustainability expert from Preston has thrown his weight behind the revised plans to reintroduce trams to the city.

Lee Petts, managing director of multi-disciplinary environmental consultancy, Remsol, says the trams would help to deliver multiple environmental and economic benefits.

“According to a Centre for Cities report in January this year, Preston is one of the worst towns and cities in England for climate changing carbon emissions, producing the equivalent of 6.9 tonnes of CO2 per person.

“Nationally, road transport is one of the worst offenders, responsible for nearly 30% of total UK CO2 emissions.”

Petts points to research that finds two-thirds of all car journeys are under 5 miles in length, with a fifth of journeys being less than a mile long. 85% of commuter car journeys are single occupancy trips.

“By taking unnecessary car journeys off local roads and allowing people to use trams instead, the Preston Trampower scheme could help to alleviate congestion whilst cutting transport CO2 emissions and improving air quality, which is linked to thousands of early deaths in the UK every year.

“Not only that, it would signal that Preston is open for investment in other sustainable transport infrastructure, helping to attract complementary schemes that can create jobs, boost mobility and make Preston a more modern, connected and lower carbon city.”

Nottingham’s tram system demonstrates the economic and regenerative benefits of investing in high quality, sustainable transport systems. Research has shown that its first line, that opened in 2004, has contributed significantly to the image of Nottingham, aiding regeneration in areas adjacent to the line and having a strong impact on nearby residential market prices. Nottingham City Council says that trams there have delivered growth in public transport use and a reduction in congestion and pollution, as well as assisting in maintaining economic competitiveness.

“Preston Trampower’s revised plans are currently out for consultation. I urge the people of Preston to join the conversation and support these plans, and hope that the city’s planning officers will recommend them for approval in due course,” concludes Petts.

Interested parties can view and comment on the planning application here until 10th April 2016.

In related news, February saw Pre Metro Operations announced as the preferred bidder to operate the Preston Trampower scheme, should it go ahead.

One Comment

  • Lee Petts says:

    For anyone thinking of submitting supportive comments via the online portal, here’s what I said:

    The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) (March 2012) sets out a number of core principles for development. One of these core principles is to actively manage patterns of growth to make the fullest possible use of public transport, walking and cycling, and focus significant development in locations which are or can be made sustainable.

    NPPF also states that encouragement should be given to solutions which support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and reduce congestion. In preparing Local Plans, local planning authorities should therefore support a pattern of development which, where reasonable to do so, facilitates the use of sustainable modes of transport.

    ‘Sustainable transport modes’ are defined as any efficient, safe and accessible means of transport with overall low impact on the environment, including walking and cycling, low and ultra low emission vehicles, car sharing and public transport.

    A passenger tram network for Preston could one day help to deliver significant greenhouse gas and congestion reductions.

    According to a Centre for Cities report in January this year, Preston is one of the worst towns and cities in England for climate changing carbon emissions, producing the equivalent of 6.9 tonnes of CO2 per person.

    Nationally, road transport is one of the worst offenders, responsible for nearly 30% of total UK CO2 emissions. We know from published Government research that two-thirds of all car journeys are under 5 miles in length, with a fifth of journeys being less than a mile long. 85% of commuter car journeys are single occupancy trips.

    By taking unnecessary car journeys off local roads and allowing people to use trams instead, the Preston Trampower scheme could help to alleviate congestion whilst cutting transport CO2 emissions and improving air quality, which is linked to thousands of early deaths in the UK every year.

    Not only that, it would signal that Preston is open for investment in other sustainable transport infrastructure, helping to attract complementary schemes that can create jobs, boost mobility and make Preston a more modern, connected and lower carbon city.

    Whilst the re-opening of the Longridge branch line detailed in the resubmitted planning application will not, on its own, result in substantive improvements in sustainable travel, it would nonetheless represent a meaningful first step toward delivering a sustainable transport system that meets the aims of the NPPF.

    On this basis, I encourage planning officers to recommend the plan for approval.

Leave a Reply